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  • Writer's pictureZiggurat Realestatecorp

Forcible Entry in the Philippines: Understanding the Law

In the Philippines, property disputes are not uncommon. One of the most common types of property disputes is called "forcible entry." Forcible entry is a legal term used to describe a situation where someone is unlawfully deprived of possession of real property. In this article, we'll discuss the law on forcible entry in the Philippines and what you can do if you find yourself in this situation.


What is Forcible Entry?


Forcible entry is a situation where a person is deprived of possession of real property through the use of force, intimidation, threat, strategy or stealth. This type of property dispute typically arises when someone takes possession of a property without the owner's consent or without any legal basis to do so.

In the Philippines, forcible entry is considered a criminal offense and is punishable under the Revised Penal Code. Under the law, anyone who commits forcible entry may face imprisonment or a fine.


How to File a Forcible Entry Case?


If you have been unlawfully deprived of possession of your property, you can file a forcible entry case in the local court. To file a forcible entry case, you must first secure a certification from the barangay (local government unit) stating that you have attempted to settle the dispute through mediation but it was unsuccessful. You must then file a complaint in the Municipal Trial Court (MTC) where the property is located.

In your complaint, you must state the following:

  • That you are the rightful possessor of the property

  • That the defendant took possession of the property through the use of force, intimidation, threat, strategy or stealth

  • That you have been unlawfully deprived of possession of the property

  • The amount of damages you are claiming

What Happens in a Forcible Entry Case?


Once a forcible entry case has been filed, the court will issue a summons to the defendant. The defendant will have a certain period of time to respond to the complaint. If the defendant fails to respond, the court may declare him or her in default.

The court will then conduct a hearing to determine whether the defendant unlawfully deprived the plaintiff of possession of the property. The plaintiff must prove that he or she is the rightful possessor of the property and that the defendant took possession of the property through the use of force, intimidation, threat, strategy or stealth.

If the court finds that the plaintiff was unlawfully deprived of possession of the property, it may issue a writ of possession, which allows the plaintiff to take possession of the property. The court may also order the defendant to pay damages to the plaintiff.


What Can You Do if You are Facing a Forcible Entry Case?


If you are facing a forcible entry case, it is important to seek the advice of a licensed attorney who is familiar with property law in the Philippines. Your attorney can help you understand your legal rights and options and can represent you in court.

To defend yourself in a forcible entry case, you must prove that you have a legal right to possess the property. If you are the owner of the property, you must present evidence to show that you are the rightful owner and that the defendant did not have any right to possess the property. If you are a tenant, you must prove that you have a valid lease agreement with the owner of the property.


In Conclusion


Forcible entry is a serious offense in the Philippines, and anyone who commits this offense may face imprisonment or a fine. If you find yourself in a situation where you have been unlawfully deprived of possession of your property, it is important to seek the advice of a licensed attorney who can help you understand your legal rights and options

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